Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from vicemag  792 notes
vicemag:

How the FBI Goes After Activists
Tom Burke was driving through a sleepy part of Grand Rapids, Michigan—an empty neighborhood full of abandoned warehouses—when he first noticed the vehicle tailing him. “I was like, Why is this car turning left whenever I turn left?” he recalled. “I figured out I was being followed.”
Tom, a 49-year-old who has been active in antiwar and labor circles for decades, had been monitored for months by the FBI, and that morning, September 24, 2010, the Bureau was moving against him and his fellow activists. Agents had raided the homes of some of Tom’s friends, seizing computers and tearing apart rooms as part of an investigation into whether they were planning an armed revolution and providing aid to terrorist organizations. In response, Tom was on his way to an internet café to issue a press release telling the world what was happening, which was about all he could do given the circumstances.
That same morning, he and his wife were served with subpoenas demanding they testify before a grand jury. By December, 23 activists across the Midwest were subpoenaed and asked to answer for their activism. Among other things, they were accused of providing “material support” for terrorism, a charge that can mean anything from providing guns to a terrorist group to providing any sort of “advice or assistance” to members of such a group, even if that advice is “lay down your arms.” (Former president Jimmy Carterwarned a few months before the raids that the threat of a “material support” charge “inhibits the work of human-rights and conflict-resolution groups.”)
Nearly four years later no one has been charged with a crime, and an unsealed affidavit, which the FBI used to get a federal judge to sign off on the 2010 raids, even notes that this group of mostly middle-aged peace activists explicitly rejected the idea of providing arms to anyone. The document, released by court order last month in response to requests from the activists, shows that an undercover special agent was intent on luring people into saying ominous things about “revolution” and, sometimes, some of these people indulged her, which provided the pretext for legally harassing a group known to oppose US policy at home and abroad.
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vicemag:

How the FBI Goes After Activists

Tom Burke was driving through a sleepy part of Grand Rapids, Michigan—an empty neighborhood full of abandoned warehouses—when he first noticed the vehicle tailing him. “I was like, Why is this car turning left whenever I turn left?” he recalled. “I figured out I was being followed.”

Tom, a 49-year-old who has been active in antiwar and labor circles for decades, had been monitored for months by the FBI, and that morning, September 24, 2010, the Bureau was moving against him and his fellow activists. Agents had raided the homes of some of Tom’s friends, seizing computers and tearing apart rooms as part of an investigation into whether they were planning an armed revolution and providing aid to terrorist organizations. In response, Tom was on his way to an internet café to issue a press release telling the world what was happening, which was about all he could do given the circumstances.

That same morning, he and his wife were served with subpoenas demanding they testify before a grand jury. By December, 23 activists across the Midwest were subpoenaed and asked to answer for their activism. Among other things, they were accused of providing “material support” for terrorism, a charge that can mean anything from providing guns to a terrorist group to providing any sort of “advice or assistance” to members of such a group, even if that advice is “lay down your arms.” (Former president Jimmy Carterwarned a few months before the raids that the threat of a “material support” charge “inhibits the work of human-rights and conflict-resolution groups.”)

Nearly four years later no one has been charged with a crime, and an unsealed affidavit, which the FBI used to get a federal judge to sign off on the 2010 raids, even notes that this group of mostly middle-aged peace activists explicitly rejected the idea of providing arms to anyone. The document, released by court order last month in response to requests from the activists, shows that an undercover special agent was intent on luring people into saying ominous things about “revolution” and, sometimes, some of these people indulged her, which provided the pretext for legally harassing a group known to oppose US policy at home and abroad.

Continue

Reblogged from oldtimefamilybaseball  26 notes

Rustin Cohle: Baseball Analyst

oldtimefamilybaseball:

Unhappy with your team’s broadcaster? Afraid of the who will be taking over for Tim McCarver?  Have no fear as State Detective Rustin Cohle is available and looking for work. 

And if the most important aspect of broadcasting is having an opinion and a good aphorism, well, Cohle’s got those in spades. 

On prospects: 

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On hitting .300: 

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On winning the World Series: 

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On fulfillment: 

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On calling for fly balls: 

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On retirement: 

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Reblogged from oldtimefamilybaseball  33 notes
oldtimefamilybaseball:

Toledo Mud Hens Unveil Ghostbusters Jerseys, greatest promotional event since the symmetrical book stacking during Philadelphia mass turbulence of 1943
The Toledo Mud Hens, realizing that their city was headed for a disaster of biblical proportions, averted all that today when they announced that on May 30th, they’ll be wearing Ghostbusters uniforms when they take the field against the Charlotte Nights. 
The evening, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Ghostbusters (the greatest film of all-time) and honoring the passing of Harold Ramis, has quickly become the 35-foot, 600 pound Twinkie of promotions. 
While I’ll be scouring for affordable flights to Toledo, hoping to score one of the jerseys when they are put up for silent auction, selling one of my kidneys if I must, there have been no words yet on whether players will be required to wear proton packs to the plate or if they’ll have to battle Sumerian gods when running the bases. We can only hope that they will.
There is some concern, however, that the Mud Hens’ stadium, Fifth Third Field, is actually just a huge super-conductive antenna that was designed and built expressly for the purpose of pulling in and concentrating spiritual turbulence. But I’m sure professionals will be on hand to deal with that. 
And if you’re looking for more Ghostbusters coverage, check out our look at the Real Ghostbusters’ episode, Night Game, when Winston has to play a team of demons for his very soul. 
(image via Toledo Mud Hens instagram) 

oldtimefamilybaseball:

Toledo Mud Hens Unveil Ghostbusters Jerseys, greatest promotional event since the symmetrical book stacking during Philadelphia mass turbulence of 1943

The Toledo Mud Hens, realizing that their city was headed for a disaster of biblical proportions, averted all that today when they announced that on May 30th, they’ll be wearing Ghostbusters uniforms when they take the field against the Charlotte Nights. 

The evening, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Ghostbusters (the greatest film of all-time) and honoring the passing of Harold Ramis, has quickly become the 35-foot, 600 pound Twinkie of promotions. 

While I’ll be scouring for affordable flights to Toledo, hoping to score one of the jerseys when they are put up for silent auction, selling one of my kidneys if I must, there have been no words yet on whether players will be required to wear proton packs to the plate or if they’ll have to battle Sumerian gods when running the bases. We can only hope that they will.

There is some concern, however, that the Mud Hens’ stadium, Fifth Third Field, is actually just a huge super-conductive antenna that was designed and built expressly for the purpose of pulling in and concentrating spiritual turbulence. But I’m sure professionals will be on hand to deal with that. 

And if you’re looking for more Ghostbusters coverage, check out our look at the Real Ghostbusters’ episode, Night Game, when Winston has to play a team of demons for his very soul

(image via Toledo Mud Hens instagram